CROSQ managers and technical officers meeting with the European Union and Quality Institution consultants on this new trade facilitation initiative with TradeCom II. Featured

New avenues for expanding intra-African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) trade are being explored, using quality as the basis for strengthening partnerships with CARICOM Member States.

This development comes with the launch of a second component of a joint TradeCom II Programme/ CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) initiative, funded by the ACP-European Union. The Kick-off meeting on the 11 March 2019 featured the start of this 2nd component of the TradeCom II programme. The overall aim of this TradeCom II intervention is to provide assistance to develop the quality services in the region, thereby allowing for increased trade capacity, competitiveness, diversification and economic performance. CARICOM’s National Bureaux of Standards (NSBs) are the main focus for the activities.

The project aims to:

o   contribute to the activation of intra-regional quality infrastructure agreements in support of market access and improved trade performance through improved capacity in standards and technical regulations development and implementation in CARICOM.  This will be facilitated through a feasibility study for developing trade capacity, enabling sustainability Standards and associated conformity assessment modalities, modelling the success of the African Organisation for Standardisation (ARSO) and a comparability study with European Standards Organisation/European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CEN/CENELEC).

o   support the development of an optimized quality infrastructure in the Pacific Region for enhanced trade competitiveness. This entails enhancing the understanding and capacity for developing Quality Infrastructure (QI) in the Pacific Islands Forum States (PIFS) through sharing the experiences of CROSQ, ARSO and CEN/CENELEC.

To achieve these goals, CROSQ will be working with the Quality Institute consultants to improve the capacity in standards and technical regulations development, and to reinforce the quality infrastructure cooperation between CROSQ, ARSO and the PIF. ARSO and PIFS are intergovernmental organisations like CROSQ that attempt to foster greater cooperation with and amongst members towards the development of the respective regions.

In his welcoming remarks on behalf of CROSQ, manager, Mr. Mohan Nandwani, pointed out that it was heartening that within the framework of activating intra-regional quality infrastructure agreements to support market access and improved trade, that this phase of the entire intervention would also see greater cooperation amongst the partners involved.

“This initiative will also include a feasibility study for developing trade capacity, enabling sustainability standards and associated conformity assessment modalities by CROSQ. This will be achieved through collaboration with ARSO. CROSQ will also be providing support to the development of an optimised quality infrastructure in the Pacific region to enhance their trade competitiveness and understanding of QI,” he said.

The European Union (EU) Delegation’s Programme Manager, Mr. Sheldon Jackman echoed the sentiments on the importance of such collaborations.

“We at the EU were heartened by the fact that cooperation was the underlying factor in making the project under the 10th EDF [European Development Fund] a successful one, and we also see that cooperation is one of the key pillars under the EPA,” he said, noting the necessity of collaborations between national and regional authorities in the area of quality towards facilitating both intra- and inter-regional trade.

He added that the EU was also encouraged by the fact that this project demonstrated a bridge between the 10th and 11th EDF Technical Barriers to Trade programmes, demonstrating the significance of collaboration, enthusiasm and cooperation, “to ensure that the commitments under the EPA by the CARIFORUM states are still being well implemented and are still top of mind”.

“Finally, I would like to stress the importance of the work being done that needs to be centred, not only on the protection of consumers but also on the private sector in the Caribbean, with practices that respond to its needs, that focus on the value chain, that build on the potential of the Caribbean economies, and concretely help businesses to export more and to achieve market penetration, not only in the EU but in other countries,” Mr. Jackman added.

CROSQ Project coordinator, Mr. Stephen Farquharson, who is also the Technical Officer – Accreditation and Conformity Assessment, noted that jointly, these initiatives revealed synergies in their objectives. Whilst the first phase focussed on the creation of a regional guide for Good Regulatory Practices, he stated that the current project was developed against the background of new and emerging practices to meet international requirements. He further noted that the initiatives also highlighted the need for interventions that would assist bureaux with coping with their changing roles in new environments; the growing need for inter-operability and the need for awareness of the economic benefits of standards.

The Lead Key Expert, Mr. Sibbesen was keen about analysing some of the factors contributing to the RQI not being fully successful and to use this opportunity to recommend strategies for its’ strengthening. There needs to be a proper balance between the National Quality Infrastructure (NQI) and the Regional Quality Infrastructure (RQI) with proper involvement of the end-users (producers, manufacturers – who are mostly Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs)).

Mr. Fulgence St. Prix noted that the “Quality Culture” of CARICOM is generally developing through increasing awareness of the importance of quality, hence the need to continue to build capacity via quality promotions. Endorsing the importance of the project, Mr. St. Prix further indicated that through the successful implementation of this project we will see the strengthening of relations between CROSQ and CEN/CENELEC; CROSQ and ARSO, which fits with the existing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) established between CROSQ and the EU standards body; and which redounds to increase maturity of the CROSQ network.

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Minister for Trade, Hon. Oliver Joseph, with the Permanent Secretary, Mr. Aaron Francois, Director of GDBS Mr. Robert Medford, Chief Executive Officer of CROSQ, Mr. Deryck Omar, Project Coordinator, CROSQ , Mr. Terry Hutchinson, Co-ordinator – Technical Co-operation Division of CDB, Ms. Andrea Power and the consultants of MESOPARTNER, Ms. Julie- Ann Laudat, Mr. Hermon Edmonson & Mr. Theodore Reddock. Featured

Grenada has received an opportunity to develop a National Quality Policy (NQP) through the programme ‘Strengthening of the Regional Quality Infrastructure’. The CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards & Quality (CROSQ) has received funding from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) to administer this programme, with one of its components being the development of national quality policies in Grenada, Antigua & Barbuda and Suriname.

A Quality Policy is the legal instrument used by governments in promoting and sustaining economic development, as well as environmental and social well-being. It is used to sustain an effective quality infrastructure, which relies on metrology, standardization, accreditation, conformity assessment and market surveillance.

The launch of the development process of Grenada’s Quality Policy was held on March 19, 2019 at the conference room of the Grenada Bureau of Standards (GDBS). Hon. Oliver Joseph, Minister of Trade, Industry, Co-operatives & CARICOM Affairs was there to share his excitement with this new development.

The firm chosen to spearhead the development of the quality policies is MESOPARTNER, a firm whose key experts are from the CARICOM region. Following the launch of the quality policy,  the  consultants  met  with  the  project  steering  committee,  whose  Chairman  is  the Permanent Secretary for Trade, Industry, Co-operatives & CARICOM Affairs, Mr. Aaron Francois.  The Project Steering Committee has as its main goal, the task of overseeing the direction and guiding the process of the development of the Quality Policy.

Several stakeholder engagements will be held throughout the year to obtain data that will be used to develop the Quality Policy, which is anticipated to be complete by December 2019.

Grenada joins Antigua and Barbuda and Suriname under this project to develop national quality policies. St. Lucia and St. Kitts & Nevis are currently developing their own NQPs, and will join countries including Jamaica, the Bahamas, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago, as bearers of national quality policies.

 

Contact:                                                               Contact:

Mr. Robert Medford                                             Ms. Lois Mc Guire

Director                                                             Information Officer

Grenada Bureau of Standards                              Grenada Bureau of Standards

Tel: 440- 5886/6783                                           Tel: 440-5886/6783

                                                                        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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The ICC website and the CARICOM Regional Energy Efficiency Building Code. Featured

The new codes will help Member States improve the energy efficiency of their buildings and support energy conservation efforts

 

Washington, D.C. – The International Code Council, ASHRAE, the CARICOM Secretariat Energy Unit and the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) announced today the release of new standards for energy efficient buildings for its Member States. The 2018 CARICOM Regional Energy Efficiency Building Code (CREEBC), which will cover both commercial and residential construction, is a joint effort by the CROSQ, the Code Council and ASHRAE.

“These standards for energy efficient buildings reflect the unique energy requirements of tropical environments and will ultimately increase adoption rates of more effectual technologies for renewable energy and energy conservation,” commented the CEO of CROSQ, Mr. Deryck Omar. “The adoption of these codes will go a long way toward allowing our members to mitigate the impacts of a changing climate. It also demonstrates the importance of bringing quality measures into the region’s energy sector and the potential benefits that can accrue when that happens.”

The CREEBC, which was developed through a collaboration between the CROSQ and the Energy Unit of the CARICOM Secretariat, is meant to meet the specific needs of nations in the Caribbean and other countries with tropical climates. It establishes minimum energy efficiency requirements for buildings, including the building envelope, cooling system, ventilation, pumping, lighting and the service water-heating systems.

Head of the Energy Unit at the CARICOM Secretariat, Dr. Devon Gardner, said, “The CREEBC is envisioned to lead to an era of better quality building designs within the Caribbean Community, noting that the ability of buildings to minimize the energy requirements for the services for which they were intended would reduce the exposure to climate and disaster risks.” He stated, as an example, that “Energy‑efficient measures and systems, such as daytime lighting and improvements in ventilation, can facilitate the comfort of occupants in buildings even during periods of natural disaster‑related stress on the electricity grids.”   

“We were pleased to have the opportunity to collaborate with our colleagues at the CROSQ to help adapt the Code Council’s latest energy standards to help their members improve the efficiency and sustainability of their buildings,” said Code Council CEO Dominic Sims, CBO. “Our codes are not one-size-fits-all. They are a starting point for developing standards that meet the individual needs of regions around the world.” 

“Improving energy efficiency is a global challenge, with buildings professionals serving as a crucial contributor toward the establishment of standards that affect building systems operations,” said 2018-2019 ASHRAE President Sheila J. Hayter, P.E. “The CREEBC and ASHRAE’s collaboration with partnering organizations represent our long standing dedication to global sustainability and leadership in use of integrated building design resources.”

The development of the CREEBC is part of the ongoing implementation of the Caribbean Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy (C-SERM), a CARICOM program aimed at increasing political will and private sector input for the adoption of more effective technologies for renewable energy, energy conservation and efficiency. 

To view the CREEBC online, click here.

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About the International Code Council

The International Code Council is a member-focused association dedicated to developing model codes and standards used in the design, build and compliance process to construct safe, sustainable, affordable and resilient structures. Most U.S. communities and many global markets choose the International Codes.

 

About CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards for Quality

The CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality is an inter-governmental organisation with its primary objective being the establishment and harmonisation of standards and the development of the region’s Quality Infrastructure for the enhanced efficiency and improved quality in the production of goods and services in the Caribbean Community.

 

About the CARICOM Secretariat

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat is the principal administrative organ for the Caribbean Community. The Secretariat is intended, inter alia, to contribute, by supporting Member States, to the improvement of the quality of life of the People of the Community and the development of an innovative and productive society, through partnerships with institutions and groups. 

 

ASHRAE

ASHRAE is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. ASHRAE and its more than 50,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today.

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Consultants meeting with regulators in Barbados. Featured

National Standards Bureaux (NSBs) and other quality improvement and control-related institutions in Caribbean are to receive assistance in implementing technical barriers to trade (TBT) provisions to better comply with trade requirements as laid out by the World Trade Organisation agreements.

The initiative is funded  by the TradeCom II Programme, which is an African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) – European Union (EU) funded project. It targets NSBs and related institutions to also help them prepare for the trade provisions of the CARIFOUM EU Economic Partnership Agreement. It is being managed by the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards & Quality (CROSQ), as part of the ACP/EU’s TradeCom II Programme.

At the kick-off meeting held recently in Barbados at the CROSQ’s Headquarters in Baobab Towers, Warrens, St. Michael, representatives of the European Union, CROSQ, the Barbados National Standards Institution, TradeCom II, Quarein – the technical assistance consultants, and the CROSQ Secretariat spoke about the varying benefits of the project.

CROSQ CEO, Mr. Deryck Omar noted that the activities under the project would allow quality institutions to better create a regional Good Regulatory Practices (GRP) guide “to gather and harmonize the disparate GRP knowledge across the Caribbean and also to enable Member States to cascade this guide into national GRP Codes of Practice (CoP)”.

“This ultimately will help countries in CARICOM by the adoption of a common approach to the development and implementation of technical regulations, as well as provide the grounds for a platform for formalized capacity development through training and awareness programmes,” he said. Furthermore, it is a natural complement to the CROSQ led CARICOM Regional Quality Policy (RQP) approved by the CARICOM Council of Ministers for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) in November 2017.

A new CROSQ regional TBT, Information Management Systems and Enquiry Point (TIE) Committee has also been formed to serve as technical support to the key expert of the project. Representatives are drawn from Barbados, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and St. Lucia, to name a few, along with Observer representatives from the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States Secretariat, and the Dominican Institute for Quality, the NSB of the Dominican Republic.

Cooperation Trade Policy Manager with the EU Delegation to Barbados, CARIFORUM and the Eastern Caribbean States, Mr Adam Wisniewski expressed his pleasure at seeing yet another trade initiative forged from the TradeCom II Programme, noting that such efforts would help to bridge the gaps between the recently concluded EU-funded 10th EDF-TBT development programme, and the upcoming 11th EDF iteration.

Mr Wisniewski expressed interest in seeing the advancement of areas specifically dealing with GRPs in the preparation, adoption and application of technical regulations across the region as a means of both consumer protection and raising the standard of quality of goods produced or used within the region.

Project manager, Mr. Stephen Farquharson of CROSQ pointed out that there were many potential opportunities to be had for both governments and businesses that upheld the rules of international commitments made to the World Trade Organisation’s TBT and Sanitary and Phytosanitary Trade Facilitation Agreements, which includes reflective articles of engagement in the EPA.

Under this TradeCom II project, there will be support for developing guides for legislation; harmonised forms of documentation and the supply of data; training programmes for individuals in the TBT and regulatory areas and promotion of the activities through monitoring and support for the TIE Committee.

Mr. Farquharson also noted that this project would help governments improve their efficiency and compliance with market requirements; reduce costs of providing services; enhance communication with trade-related entities; protect consumers and aid the economic wellbeing of stakeholders. Businesses, he said, would also benefit through the simplification of procedures and legal requirements; reduction of ambiguity and dissent and the development of better communication between the border/regulatory agencies and the stakeholders.

Quarein expressed their appreciation for being given the opportunity to work on this project to further aid the development of trade and quality infrastructure projects, noting that the team looked forward to a regionally inclusive, consensus based and collaborative approach on delivering the regional GRP Guide and a sample national COP derived through the same process. There is also to be an information and educational campaign to encourage use of the documents.

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CROSQ Director and Acting Director of the Barbados National Standards Institution, Mrs. Anthea Ishmael speaking about regional cooperation for trade. Featured

Two regional partners regaled the importance of cooperation in achieving beneficial objectives, as a new project was launched recently to help improve quality systems in the Caribbean.

The “Strengthening of the Regional Quality Infrastructure Programme”, a joint initiative between the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ), is funded by the CDB to the tune of US$750,000.

The three main objectives of the 18-months project are:

  • Development of National Quality Policies (NQPs) using the Regional Quality Policy (RQP) in at least five countries with associated Implementation Roadmaps in order to strengthen the policy and regulatory framework to support national quality infrastructure (NQI) development;
  • Technical assistance to at least two testing laboratories for International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) 17025 accreditation; and,
  • Design and implementation of a comprehensive information and awareness campaign to promote and sensitise stakeholders on matters relating to the operationalisation of the quality policies and to improve knowledge and use of accredited testing services.

At the launch, held at the CDB’s Conference Room, Wildey, St. Michael, Barbados, one of the Directors of CROSQ, Mrs. Anthea Ishmael noted that this project was coming at a time when the organisation was ever expanding its partnerships regionally and internationally.

She noted that projects, including with the European Union, the Federal Republic of Germany through the German National Metrology Institute, the CARICOM Energy Unit, the African Regional Standards Organisation (ARSO); the European Committee for Standardization, ASTM International, United Nations Industrial and Development Organisation, the ACP Secretariat and several others were all partnerships that were bringing value to the region by expanding the expertise of quality professionals and institutions here.

This new project, would continue adding value to what currently exists, said Mrs. Ishmael, who is also Acting Director of the Barbados National Standards Institution (BNSI).

“Our region has always had tremendous potential, but challenges have existed and continue to exist in accessing opportunities and technical assistance to push our industries further; to make our sectors more competitive beyond our shores. This is where the CROSQ and CDB can be more effective in our relationship – bringing that kind of value to those who need it,” she noted.

In remarking on the Bank’s commitment to development and integration, Coordinator of Regional Cooperation and Integration, Ms. Andrea Power stated: “The project is indicative of the Bank’s belief in and commitment to regional integration as the basis on which our economies can achieve global competitiveness. It is for this reason that the Bank has given priority to partnering with technically competent regional institutions to facilitate the implementation of regional decisions and policies at the national level. All this with the ultimate goal of increasing intra-regional trade.”

CROSQ is the network of 15 national bureaux of standards of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM). Its partnerships with the CDB date back to 2012 when the two entities first began cooperating towards creating regional standards and quality systems in specific sectors.

Following the launch, the Project Steering Committee for the Strengthening of the Regional Quality Infrastructure Programme, met to discuss a number of issues pertinent to the success of the project. The Committee is comprised of representatives of the CDB, CROSQ, the Caribbean Export and Development Agency (CEDA) and a regional QI institution and accreditation body.

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Belize’s Citrus Growers Association CEO Mr. Henry Anderson (second right) accepts the accreditation certificate from Chairman of JANAAC, Mr. Simon Roberts, while CROSQ’s Chairperson, Dr. Renae Ferguson-Bufford (left) and CDB’s Ms. Andrea Power look on proudly. Featured

The CARICOM Region now has its first accredited citrus plant pathology laboratory, located in Belize.

The Belize Citrus Growers Association’s (CGA) was awarded the ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation certificate by the Jamaica National Agency for Accreditation (JANAAC) at the 32nd Meeting of the Council of the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) held in Barbados recently.

The CGA’s Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Henry Anderson noted that this accreditation was proof that the laboratory was competent to perform tests to the “General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories” ISO / IEC 17025 Standard.

“Continuous analysis of the regional and global marketplace led us to the realization that we were competing not in a traditional citrus industry but in a juice industry. While we must redouble our efforts to expand our citrus production, we must do so while complementing our citrus production with the production of other fruit varieties and vegetables that can be processed to formulate the juice blends that are now being demanded by the regional and global marketplace,” he said.

To do this, he noted that the association set out to achieve management system certification of its Plant World Nursery with assistance from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), which should happen by the end of this year; accreditation of its laboratories operated by the association’s research arm, the Citrus Research and Education Institute (CREI); improvement of its commercial services and scaling up operations within its production and processing company. All these elements, he maintained, would strengthen the overall citrus value chain operated by CGA.

“Our vision was in the first instance to improve customer service and then to attract resources to get ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation for the lab and ISO 9001:2015 certification for Plant World Nursery. These would be leveraged to submit a proposal and get exclusive access to two patented HLB Valencia citrus varieties that were being released in Florida.”

The CDB has played a crucial role in financing the technical assistance to get the laboratory and nursery towards certification and then accreditation status. CROSQ provided the technical assistance for the accreditation through its Caribbean Cooperation for Accreditation (CCA) Scheme.. In this case, JANAAC was the accreditation body that conducted the assessments to verify the lab’s conformance to the standard.

The CEO also praised his team for their commitment. “We have a very small team, but they set sail down the river of uncertainty and worked seven days per week, twelve to fifteen hours per day to get accredited for five test methods - HLB, Citrus Psorosis, Citrus Tristeza, pH water and pH soil. All tests that are critical to the production of citrus nursery plants that must comply with the Belize Agricultural Health Authority’s Belize Citrus Certification Program regulations.

“CDB relied on CROSQ to provide technical oversight for the project and both organizations allowed us to synchronize the work of their respective consultants - Mrs. Maxine Campbell for CROSQ project and Dr. Raymond Reid for CDB project. This collaboration by two regional organizations is a model to be replicated,” stated Mr. Anderson.

Coordinator, Regional Cooperation and Integration in the Regional Cooperation Division of the CDB, Ms. Andrea Power stated: “CDB’s support for the accreditation of the CGA Lab both through the EU EPA Standby Facility and the CDB’s Caribbean Technological Consultancy Services (CTCS) is part of an overall effort by the Bank to support regional cooperation and integration in general and to facilitate increased intra-regional trade in particular. The Bank remains committed to supporting enhanced quality infrastructure so that more regionally produced goods can meet market access requirements.”

CROSQ’s CEO, Mr. Deryck Omar, who praised all the partners involved said it was a proud moment for the organisation and the collaborative mechanisms within the CARICOM Region which saw this accreditation come to pass.

“When the CROSQ Caribbean Cooperation for Accreditation (CCA) Scheme was established, it was envisioned as a way to not only bring the cost of accreditation down across the region, but as a way to pool our knowledge and skills as a region, so those with the expertise could assist, through a cooperative arrangement, those who needed support to accreditation and did not have all the requisite resources. Since the scheme started under the 10th EDF-TBT (European Development Fund-Technical Barriers to Trade) Programme, we’ve seen more and more labs being accredited under the CCA.

“All this also comes together because of donor agencies who are willing to also put their contributions behind the process, and that’s where organisations like the Caribbean Development Bank, the UK Department for International Development (DFID), the European Union (EU) and others, who have played a part, because it is a serious financial undertaking when labs decide to take this step toward accreditation. The wonderful thing about it though is that we have been proving throughout the CARICOM chain that the benefits are worth it, for the lives, health and safety of our Caribbean populations.”

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Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Guyana will be part of a massive initiative aimed at promoting standards in the Caribbean when ASTM International, one of the world’s leading standards organizations, hosts several events in the Region as part of the “Caribbean Roadshow”, from June 4-8.

The roadshow includes outreach, training, and education focused on the growing use of ASTM International standards and International Code Council (ICC) codes. The team will highlight longstanding Caribbean partnerships and focus on how standards and codes are the foundation for quality and safety in construction projects.

Activities also include industry workshops and meetings with high-profile groups in Kingston (June 4-5), Port of Spain (June 6), and Georgetown (June 7-8). Speakers will include Mark Johnson, executive vice president of ICC, and R. Christopher Mathis, ASTM International board member and president of MC2 Mathis Consulting.

“This partnership involves unprecedented outreach and networking aimed at finding solutions to sustainable construction challenges,” said ASTM International director of external relations, James Olshefsky. “We look forward to highlighting the many members and dozens of partners who increasingly use ASTM’s high-quality standards throughout the region.”

In addition, the roadshow will include student forums during which students will learn about ASTM’s academic offerings, and laboratory roundtables, where ASTM staff will present information about ASTM’s laboratory services.

ASTM International has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) as well as many of its member states including Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Guyana. These agreements encourage participation of technical experts worldwide in the standards development process, while also broadening the global acceptance of ASTM International standards.

The “Caribbean Roadshow” follows a similar roadshow in September 2017 to El Salvador, Costa Rica, and Panama.

Over the past 17 years, ASTM International has signed 109 MOUs with national standards bodies worldwide. As a result, its standards have been referenced more than 7,500 times outside the United States in laws, regulations, codes, and elsewhere. For more information on this program, visit www.astm.org/GLOBAL/mou.html.

Follow the Road Show on Facebook and Twitter (#ASTMRoadShow).

 

About ASTM International

Committed to serving global societal needs, ASTM International positively impacts public health and safety, consumer confidence, and overall quality of life. We integrate consensus standards – developed with our international membership of volunteer technical experts – and innovate services to improve lives… Helping our world work better.

Media Inquiries: Dan Bergels, tel +1.610.832.9602; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Roadshow Contact: James Olshefsky, tel +1.610.832.9714; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(*THIS IS AN ADAPTED ASTM INTERNATIONAL NEWS RELEASE)

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CARICOM Countries to Phase Out Incandescent Bulbs Featured

As the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) moves to become more energy efficient, steps are being taken to phase out the use of incandescent bulbs. On the basis of a mandate from the CARICOM Energy Ministers, plans for the phase‑out programme are now being developed by the CARICOM Secretariat and the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) and are expected to be completed in September 2018.

The programme, according to Representatives from the CARICOM Secretariat, will include a roadmap to reduce the import and sale of incandescent light bulbs within the region, and will guide and support countries in the establishment of regulations and actions for the phasing out exercise. If all goes according to the plan, incandescent bulbs will gradually be phased-out as energy efficiency standards for lighting are phased-in. The phase-out schedule could begin as early as January 2019 with the 100 watt incandescent bulbs, with further restrictions on smaller lamp sizes entering into force in incremental stages over a number of years.

The decision to develop the phase-out programme was taken at the recently-concluded Meeting of CARICOM Energy Ministers. The Meeting was held at the CARICOM Secretariat in Georgetown, Guyana on 19 April 2018,  and was chaired by Senator the Hon. Darcy Boyce, Minister of State in the Office of the Prime Minister of Barbados with responsibility for Energy. The Ministers took the decision as part of the menu of quality measures that are being undertaken to steer the Community towards energy efficiency and sector regulation.

The incandescent light bulb has existed for 130 years and are inefficient because they waste most of their energy. They are very cheap to manufacture and purchase but only 5% of the input power is converted into visible light, with the remainder converted into waste heat. Hence, they are expensive to operate and lead to high electricity bills for households and businesses that use them. The natural successors to the incandescent bulb are compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These use 60-90% less energy than incandescent lighting and offer a much longer lifespan.

In 2015, the CARICOM Ministers had approved energy perform standards for CFLs and LEDs. These standards protect consumers from “underperforming products” while simultaneously protecting importers of highly efficient products from competitors saturating the market with “cheaper”, low‑performance products. Effort is being made for the standards for CFLs and LEDs to be adopted at national levels before year‑end as an assurance of quality in the efficient lighting alternatives is a precursor to the removal of inefficient incandescent bulbs from CARICOM markets.

Cuba was the first country in the world to successfully complete the phase-out of incandescent bulbs. In 2007, the Caribbean country banned the import and sale of incandescent bulbs and implemented a programme for their direct substitution with CFLs in households. According to reports, about 116 million incandescent bulbs were replaced by CFLs in every household in Cuba, resulting in peak demand savings of about 4,000 MW and 8 million tons of carbon emissions. 

Regional Energy Efficiency Building Code

Among the other steps that the region has taken on the road to energy efficiency is the development of an Energy Efficiency Code for buildings within the CARICOM. Energy Ministers, at the April 19 Meeting in Guyana, also approved the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code, with the accompanying Caribbean Application Document, as the Regional Energy Efficient Building Code (REEBC).

The establishment of the REEBC is a very important step in creating a clear and generally-accepted framework for maximising the efficiency of the “total” energy services in buildings. The approval paves the way for the systematic implementation of the principles and practices related to, among other things, energy efficient lamps and lighting. The phase out of incandescent bulbs is consistent with the requirements of the recently‑approved Energy Efficiency Code for CARICOM buildings.

Within CARICOM, successful implementation of the REEBC could eliminate 15,000 barrels of imported oil (and save around US$ 1 million in foreign exchange) every day.

 

Contacts

Michelle Nurse:       This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Devon Gardner:       This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(News Release by the CARICOM Energy Unit)

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Coordinator of Regional Cooperation with the Caribbean Development Bank, Ms. Andrea Power. Featured

The CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) has been praised by regional and international partners for the role it continues to play in supporting the improvement of the quality of products and services traded within the region.

The praise, from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the European Union (EU), came as CROSQ was hosting the 32nd Meeting of its Council of National Bureaux of Standards’ Directors in Barbados recently.

Coordinator of Regional Cooperation and Integration in the Technical Cooperation Division of CDB, Ms. Andrea Power, told the opening of the meeting that CROSQ’s model of cost-effectively pooling resources between member states to provide “complementary systems and services” held the potential to be a benchmark model in the area of trade.

“CDB is pleased to participate in the 32nd meeting of the council of CROSQ. The Board’s commitment to and mandate to promote regional integration is rooted in its founding charter and as such the promotion of regional integration is a cross-cutting thematic priority within our strategic framework.

“Our commitment to regional integration is also rooted in a certain belief that if we get it right, regional integration represents a unique opportunity for the region to take advantage of international trade and insert itself into global value chains on our own terms and in a more sustainable and resilient way,” said the Bank official.

Ms. Power further called for a completion of the regional Single Market, stating, “While we have expended significant effort to remove restrictions found in our laws, we must now aggressively pursue what I call market making reforms and building out of regional public goods which will make the single market more efficient and make access to the single market more equitable.”

She highlighted the Bank’s recent commitment of US$700,000 towards developing national quality policies in five countries, based on CROSQ’s own Regional Quality Policy, as well as the intention to add another two regional analytical laboratories to the growing list of those being accredited.

Her comments followed those of the First Secretary to the Delegation of the European Union to Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean States, the OECS and CARICOM/CARIFORUM, Mr. Luca Pierantoni, who noted that the execution of the technical barriers to trade (TBT) component of the 10th European Development Fund programme, by German National Metrology Institute, CROSQ, the Quality Institute of the Dominican Republic was a success because of cooperation between entities.

Mr. Pierantoni maintained, “Experience has demonstrated that actions at the regional level will be unsuccessful without the commitment, support and involvement of concerned actors at the national level,” adding that the partnership of regional and national entities would continue to be important to the success of the upcoming TBT programme of the 11th EDF.

“One thing that we will always need to keep in mind is that whatever we do, whatever we establish, all the certification mechanisms that we set up, all the laboratories that we help operationalize, all the legislation that we help draft, all the regulations that we manage to review, should have only one aim: to benefit the people outside that door; to create more conducive conditions to make business in the Caribbean; to make the private sector of the Caribbean more competitive,” the EU First Secretary reiterated.

“We want a system that is centered on the private sector of the Caribbean, that responds to its needs; that focusses on the value chain; that builds on the potentials that the Caribbean economies have and concretely help the business to export more and better and to reach durable market penetration in Europe and elsewhere,” he said.

The meeting comprised two open days of dialogues with agencies including the Pan-American Health Organisation/World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO); the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA); the CARICOM Secretariat; the Caribbean Poultry Association; ASTM International; the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO); Caribbean Export Development Agency and several others.

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The Saint Lucia Bureau of Standards has successfully completed the first year surveillance audit for the three-year certification to the ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management System standard. The audit conducted in March 2018 has recommended that the SLBS maintain registration to the ISO 9001:2015 certification.

The surveillance audit is a check of the system to ensure that the SLBS is consistently maintaining and delivering an effective quality management system, and drives continuous improvements to products, services, and internal processes.

The surveillance audit was conducted over two days by the independent accredited registrar company Perry Johnsons Registrars of the United States.

ISO 9001 is the world’s most popular quality management system standard that helps businesses demonstrate their ability to consistently provide products and services that satisfy customer, statutory and regulatory requirements. The certification aims to enhance customer satisfaction through the effective application of a company’s system, including processes for improving the system while assuring compliance with regulations.

The scope of the SLBS’ certification extends to most processes across the organization. Achieving ISO 9001 certification highlights the SLBS’ commitment to consistently measure quality by defining and documenting procedures to ensure the consistency of outputs and instituting corrective actions when required.

For more information contact Head of Information Vernet St. Omer-Fontenelle This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 453-0049/720-8756

(Press Release from the Saint Lucia Bureau of Standards - SLBS)

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