Coordinator of Regional Cooperation with the Caribbean Development Bank, Ms. Andrea Power. Featured

The CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) has been praised by regional and international partners for the role it continues to play in supporting the improvement of the quality of products and services traded within the region.

The praise, from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the European Union (EU), came as CROSQ was hosting the 32nd Meeting of its Council of National Bureaux of Standards’ Directors in Barbados recently.

Coordinator of Regional Cooperation and Integration in the Technical Cooperation Division of CDB, Ms. Andrea Power, told the opening of the meeting that CROSQ’s model of cost-effectively pooling resources between member states to provide “complementary systems and services” held the potential to be a benchmark model in the area of trade.

“CDB is pleased to participate in the 32nd meeting of the council of CROSQ. The Board’s commitment to and mandate to promote regional integration is rooted in its founding charter and as such the promotion of regional integration is a cross-cutting thematic priority within our strategic framework.

“Our commitment to regional integration is also rooted in a certain belief that if we get it right, regional integration represents a unique opportunity for the region to take advantage of international trade and insert itself into global value chains on our own terms and in a more sustainable and resilient way,” said the Bank official.

Ms. Power further called for a completion of the regional Single Market, stating, “While we have expended significant effort to remove restrictions found in our laws, we must now aggressively pursue what I call market making reforms and building out of regional public goods which will make the single market more efficient and make access to the single market more equitable.”

She highlighted the Bank’s recent commitment of US$700,000 towards developing national quality policies in five countries, based on CROSQ’s own Regional Quality Policy, as well as the intention to add another two regional analytical laboratories to the growing list of those being accredited.

Her comments followed those of the First Secretary to the Delegation of the European Union to Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean States, the OECS and CARICOM/CARIFORUM, Mr. Luca Pierantoni, who noted that the execution of the technical barriers to trade (TBT) component of the 10th European Development Fund programme, by German National Metrology Institute, CROSQ, the Quality Institute of the Dominican Republic was a success because of cooperation between entities.

Mr. Pierantoni maintained, “Experience has demonstrated that actions at the regional level will be unsuccessful without the commitment, support and involvement of concerned actors at the national level,” adding that the partnership of regional and national entities would continue to be important to the success of the upcoming TBT programme of the 11th EDF.

“One thing that we will always need to keep in mind is that whatever we do, whatever we establish, all the certification mechanisms that we set up, all the laboratories that we help operationalize, all the legislation that we help draft, all the regulations that we manage to review, should have only one aim: to benefit the people outside that door; to create more conducive conditions to make business in the Caribbean; to make the private sector of the Caribbean more competitive,” the EU First Secretary reiterated.

“We want a system that is centered on the private sector of the Caribbean, that responds to its needs; that focusses on the value chain; that builds on the potentials that the Caribbean economies have and concretely help the business to export more and better and to reach durable market penetration in Europe and elsewhere,” he said.

The meeting comprised two open days of dialogues with agencies including the Pan-American Health Organisation/World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO); the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA); the CARICOM Secretariat; the Caribbean Poultry Association; ASTM International; the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO); Caribbean Export Development Agency and several others.

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The Saint Lucia Bureau of Standards has successfully completed the first year surveillance audit for the three-year certification to the ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management System standard. The audit conducted in March 2018 has recommended that the SLBS maintain registration to the ISO 9001:2015 certification.

The surveillance audit is a check of the system to ensure that the SLBS is consistently maintaining and delivering an effective quality management system, and drives continuous improvements to products, services, and internal processes.

The surveillance audit was conducted over two days by the independent accredited registrar company Perry Johnsons Registrars of the United States.

ISO 9001 is the world’s most popular quality management system standard that helps businesses demonstrate their ability to consistently provide products and services that satisfy customer, statutory and regulatory requirements. The certification aims to enhance customer satisfaction through the effective application of a company’s system, including processes for improving the system while assuring compliance with regulations.

The scope of the SLBS’ certification extends to most processes across the organization. Achieving ISO 9001 certification highlights the SLBS’ commitment to consistently measure quality by defining and documenting procedures to ensure the consistency of outputs and instituting corrective actions when required.

For more information contact Head of Information Vernet St. Omer-Fontenelle This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 453-0049/720-8756

(Press Release from the Saint Lucia Bureau of Standards - SLBS)

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CEO of CROSQ Secretariat, Mr. Deryck Omar. Featured

A number of international and regional organisations are scheduled to be in Barbados from April 4-6, 2018 for the 32nd meeting of the Council of Directors of the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards & Quality (CROSQ).

The Secretary General of the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO), Mr. Sergio Mujica, as well as representatives of United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the Pan-American Health Organisation (PAHO) will be among a number of international experts in standardisation, trade and trade facilitation and international health matters, who will be addressing the directors of the CARICOM bureaux of standards during the three-day meeting to be held at the Accra Beach Resort.

The meeting, being jointly hosted by the Barbados National Standards Institute (BNSI), opens at 9 a.m. on April 4, and will discuss how each of these areas fit into the quality agenda of the region during the first two days. The third day is a closed meeting exclusive to the directors to look at the direction and development of quality infrastructure for the year ahead.

The opening ceremony is also set to be addressed by The European Union’s First Secretary, Mr. Luca Pierantoni; Barbados’ Minister of Industry, International Business, Commerce & Small Business Development, Mr. Donville Inniss; and the Caribbean Development Bank’s Coordinator of Regional Cooperation and Integration, Ms. Andrea Power.

CEO of CROSQ, Mr. Deryck Omar stated that it was also an honour for the organisation to be hosting so many international and regional leaders, including those from the CARICOM Secretariat, the Caribbean Agricultural Health and Food Safety Agency (CAHFSA), and Caribbean Export, who could contribute to the ongoing discussion in CARICOM of how quality services are developed and what the region should be doing to improve life, health and safety here with quality as the stepping stone.

“This is the first time one of our Council Meetings will see this kind of engagement of such a wide range of professionals and leaders from so many areas that can add value to the work done by our bureaux of standards. In this increasingly expanding global environment, if we do not take the challenge of how we facilitate trade seriously; if we don’t take care in how we develop the services and infrastructure that help our products export and improve the products and services we offer as a region, then we will be left totally out of the loop.

“That essentially is what this meeting is about – bringing some of the minds together to discuss what is happening internationally and regionally and how they twin and mesh and finding out where the divergence and gaps are, so we can respond with convergence opportunities as a CARICOM Region. We can only do better if we have the information of what is out there,” said the CEO.

The CROSQ CEO noted: “It must also be said that after this meeting this week, in a few weeks CROSQ will officially be introducing the Regional Quality Policy to the region as a whole which deals with how we develop our quality infrastructure services, and this will include the roles that our public and private sectors, as well as civil society have to play in advancing our standards; our measurement capabilities and facilities; our accreditation and certification for services and products; and then how we spread the awareness of what is available to every corner of our region.”

This 32nd meeting will also be the first for the new Chair of CROSQ, Dr. Renae Ferguson-Bufford of the Bahamas Bureau of Standards and Quality (BBSQ) who was appointed during last year’s meeting in St. Kitts and Nevis.

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The Board of Directors of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) has approved USD750,000 in funding for a programme that will assist the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) with strengthening intra-regional trade.

At least five countries – Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, Guyana, Saint Lucia and Suriname – will benefit from three interventions to be implemented by the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ).

“This programme will assist producers with overcoming some of the challenges encountered when trying to export their products, and will therefore enhance their ability to increase market access, penetrate new markets and integrate into global value chains,” said Mr. Daniel Best, Director of Projects, CDB.

“Some of the key constraints manufacturers, exporters and service providers in the CARICOM face are caused by non-tariff trade barriers, otherwise known as Technical Barriers to Trade,” he added.

The Director also noted that well-functioning quality infrastructure can minimize TBTs, open doors for producers in CARICOM countries to regional and international markets, and help them to raise the standard of their production processes, thereby enhancing their competitiveness.

Quality infrastructure refers to the public and private institutional framework required to implement standardisation, accreditation and conformity assessment services, including inspection, testing, and laboratory and product certification.

The CDB-funded interventions will assist with bringing Regional goods in line with international standards.

They include:

  • developing National Quality Policies intended to protect consumers and safeguard human health, safety, and the environment;
  • technical assistance to two testing laboratories – to be chosen from among the five countries – for International Standards Organisation (ISO) 10725 accreditation; and
  • development and implementation of an awareness campaign to promote and sensitise stakeholders, particularly women, indigenous people, youth and other minority and at risk groups, on matters related to the development and implementation of quality policies, and to improve knowledge and use of accredited testing services.

CROSQ is scheduled to commence the 18-month Strengthening of Regional Quality Infrastructure Programme in May, 2018. The interventions to be rolled out under the initiative are consistent with the Bank’s strategic objective of supporting inclusive and sustainable growth and development within its Borrowing Member Countries.

(Source: CDB Press Release)

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An ABBS staff member demonstrating one of the steps in the verification process. (Photo supplied by ABBS) Featured

The Antigua and Barbuda Bureau of Standards (ABBS) has officially launched its fuel pump verification programme, thereby joining the ranks of some other CROSQ Member States.

In April this year, the Metrology Act came into effect and the Bureau of Standards proposed its first steps for implementation of the Act to be the establishment of a national Fuel Pump Verification Service.

At the launch of the programme a few months later, Chairman of the Antigua and Barbuda Standards Council, Mr. Cottrille George said: “This journey for developing the nation’s quality infrastructure employs metrology or measurement  science as one of the main vehicles for  promoting  fairness and equity in trade, business excellence and  consumer confidence. 

“It is for this reason that we celebrated the proclamation of the Metrology Act in April this year. This Act gives credence to the Bureau’s mandate to ensure the accuracy of weighing and measuring instruments used in trade. The  practice of checking, because  it is mandated by law, is  known as  legal Metrology, and will soon become a  regular consideration and /or  characteristic  of  any  form of business for  which earnings or  profit are derived from measurements  based  activities.”

The journey to this stage involved Bureau of Standards personnel working with the fuel suppliers and retailers to perform checks/tests on the fuel dispensers for accuracy to ensure that the pumps are delivering correctly the stated metered quantities. This will ensure that consumers are receiving the quantities purchased and also retailers are not losing product due to faulty dispensing.

Having done the necessary preliminary checks, all fuel dispensers that have “passed the test” will be affixed with a blue validation sticker providing the logo and name of the Antigua and Barbuda Bureau of Standards and the expiration date of the authentication of the specific fuel dispenser nozzle.  

Consumers are being educated to look for these validation stickers and verifications will be carried out hereafter, in accordance with the provisions of the Metrology Act and Regulations. Lessons learnt will be shared with regional metrologists through CROSQ’s Caribbean Metrology Network (CARIMET) and that is recognized by SIM, the Inter-American Metrology System.

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CROSQ Technical Officer, Metrology, Mr. David Tomlinson presenting at the Energy Sensitization Workshop for the R3E Project. Featured
07 December 2017

CROSQ Talking Energy

A major aspect to the recent 31st Meeting of the Council of CROSQ, in St. Kitts and Nevis was a half-day sensitization seminar on the ground-breaking efforts CROSQ has initialised in the area of energy, with joint-venture support from the CARICOM Secretariat’s Energy Unit.

The workshop, which took place on the first day of the two day CROSQ Council meeting, focused strictly on the increasing energy portfolio of the CROSQ network – namely the Regional Energy Efficiency Building Code (REEBC) Project, which is partnered with the GIZ-REETA programme (German Development Agency, Renewable Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance programme); and the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (R3E) Project, which is funded by the German National Metrology Institute (PTB).

Technical Officer, Communication and Information, Ms. Latoya Burnham, who conceptualised the seminar, along with other technical staff of the CROSQ Secretariat explained that the key objective was awareness.

“The main things we wanted our directors to walk away with were – an understanding of the progress made thus far with our energy projects; what the next steps would be, and what would be needed in terms of collaborations and cooperation to make our outcomes successful. Primary among all this of course, was to also hear what their concerns were; their thoughts on the Energy Roadmap that has been devised with considerable CARICOM Energy Unit input and their suggestions to us that could make it all happen.

“The manner in which CROSQ functions makes all our project implementation at the national level; so whatever we do at the Secretariat, has to be rolled out on the ground among our regional people. So at every stage, the consultation, buy-in and clear ideas of the roles different parties have to play must be a central thread,” she stated.

As such, the Communication Officer said she believed their objectives were reached, especially as far as Member States understanding what comes next, how and why.

For the R3E Project, there was a major stakeholder meeting in Guyana in late October, and the Draft Minimum Energy Performance Standards for Energy Efficiency Buildings in the REEBC Project was still in Member States for comment and feedback, a process that remained open until the end of November 2017.

Activities will intensify in 2018 - with the expected approval of the REEBC by the CARICOM Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) and then the development of model legislation for the REEBC along with conferences and stakeholder engagements; and too, the declaration of regional standards for energy efficient lighting, air conditioners and refrigerators in the R3E Project, along with strengthening of laboratory testing capabilities for energy efficiency in these devices.

There will also be a pilot project for the energy efficient labelling scheme in select countries.

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New CROSQ Chairperson, Dr. Renae Ferguson-Bufford Featured

There is a new chairperson at the helm of the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ).

Dr. Renae Ferguson-Bufford, who is also Director of the Bahamas Bureau of Standards and Quality (BBSQ), was selected to office during the 31st Meeting of the Council of CROSQ, held in St. Kitts and Nevis in October. She takes over the reins from outgoing chairman, Mr. Jose Trejo, Director of the Belize Bureau of Standards.

In her incoming remarks, Dr. Ferguson-Bufford underscored her satisfaction with the work the CROSQ network of standards, metrology, accreditation and conformity assessment bodies has been engaged in over the years and her willingness to work through the CROSQ Secretariat to continue the work.

“I would really like to thank the CROSQ Council for the faith it has placed in me to take on this mantle of leadership. I know this is a great responsibility to lead the network of bureaux and I promise to strive to do what I can to ensure that the success we have enjoyed under past leaders continues. I would like to also thank our past directors who have led this body of agencies for the work they have done and the path they have blazed for me to continue,” said the incoming chairperson.

The new chair, took over from Belize Bureau of Standards Director, Mr. Jose Trejo, and will serve alongside Mrs. Candelle Walcott-Bostwick, Director of the Guyana National Bureau of Standards, who is Vice Chair.

Dr. Fergusson-Bufford shared her vision for what she would like to achieve during her tenure in the post:

“I believe my role as chairperson is to further progress the mandate of CROSQ and to expand its profile internationally; both in presence and voice. In fulfilling this vision and mission, as well as to ensure the strategic goals are being carried out effectively and efficiently and that regional initiatives are guided by individual national priorities, I will continue the governance, advocacy, and outreach effort to all, so as to support the sustainable production and trade of goods and services in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy and beyond.”

Dr. Ferguson-Bufford noted that during the tenure of the last two chairpersons, Mrs. Anthea Ishmael of the Barbados National Standards Institute and Mr. Jose Trejo, there was considerable work done to produce a Regional Quality Policy, and this was one of the initiatives she would like to see implemented during her term in office.

“I am in full agreement with the objectives as set out in our Regional Quality Policy and share the sentiments of our past directors that with this policy in place we can, as a region, really begin examining how we make quality a part of all our everyday life in nation building. If we want to see our competitiveness increase and level of innovation improved in the region, we have to be serious about making sure quality improvement systems are an integral part of our productive environment, and so I look forward to continuing that drive at the regional level to ensuring this thinking gets pride of place in action at the national level,” she said.

But her mandate, she noted, would also include ensuring that the Bahamas bureau continued its current path of development as well.

“At the bureau, we have a team of qualified, well trained Bahamians, who have demonstrated the competence, ability, dedication and commitment to ensure that every function of the Bureau is developed to achieve its objectives and by extension the overall value of the BBSQ as outlined in our Strategic Plan.

“In the past three to four years we have made significant strides at development, thanks to the efforts of the CROSQ fraternity of Member States and other external financing and technical assistance agencies. I know we will continue our trajectory of growth that will enable us not only to help our own citizens, but the rest of CARICOM as well by contributing to the development of our Regional Quality Infrastructure.”

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10 October 2017

CROSQ on Good Path

The following is an edited version of the speech by Outgoing Chairman of the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards & Quality, Mr. Jose Trejo at the Opening of the 31st Meeting of the Council of CROSQ, held at Marriott Resort, Frigate Bay, St. Kitts & Nevis on October 5, 2017.

It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the 31st Council Meeting of the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality. A special welcome to the Acting Permanent Secretary, Mrs. Weekes, we are glad that you could be here with us this morning to share a little bit of your time, surely enough we welcome you to stay for our seminar that will follow immediately after, to learn about the strides we are making in energy standards etc.  Let me also extend our sincerest gratitude to our host, Mr. Hiram Williams, Director of the St. Kitts Bureau of Standards for receiving us so graciously during our short stay. To the Directors, friends and colleagues present, I extend a warm welcome.

Before I address you, in my last capacity as Chairman of the Council, I would like to take this time to express our deepest sympathies to all the Caribbean Islands – CARICOM and non-CARICOM – that have been devastated by the passing of two successive and powerful hurricanes in the likes of Irma and Maria. As I watched the images light up on the television screen, I admittedly was jaded, as I am sure most of us were, in disbelief that this could be happening and that it did. The images that you no doubt have seen are a stark reminder that Mother Nature unleashes her fury at will and that the only thing that we can be thankful for in the aftermath, is life itself. Anything outside of this can be replaced. Anything outside of this can be rebuilt; but more so it speaks to the resolve of the unbreakable human spirit to carry on despite the heartbreaking devastation. I am positive that the strength and courage of the peoples of the Caribbean will prevail and that life as we know it will return to some sense of normalcy. We wish for a speedy recovery with the hope that the rhythmic sounds of steel pan and salsa will soon reverberate, flowing from the comfort of homes into the streets, fast restoring what we have come to recognise as truly Caribbean.

Colleagues, now to the order of business. As we gather here today at this 31st meeting, there is an enormous sense of pride felt as I reflect on what we collectively have achieved. It is without question that the Regional Quality Infrastructure (RQI) that we have been tirelessly focusing on over the past decade, is now bearing fruit.  In no special order, the region boasts its first ever Regional Quality Policy; a 5-year regional standards development priority plan; laboratories accredited with some as I speak in the pipeline; establishment of two Caribbean Reference Laboratories in Volume and Temperature; Quality Awards schemes developed, marketing and communication plans that in principle are packaged to promote and sell QI services; a Secretariat that has developed an on-demand skill-set that can now confidently extend itself to the wider region.  Fair to say that the majority of this was accomplished under the 10th EDF-TBT project executed by the PTB with CROSQ and INDOCAL serving as sub-executing agencies.

To this end, it is important to recognise the technical and financial support that the region has received from its regional and international partners and donor agencies. Arms outstretched, it also serves as given testimony that the region has slowly gained the trust and confidence of it partners and agencies as evidenced in the scaling up of recent initiatives, namely CDB, Tradecom and the PTB to mention a few.  As this pool widens so will the benefits flow towards the continued advancement of the RQI.

Colleagues, as we push towards a new frontier we are bound to encounter challenges. I therefore urge you to be ever so mindful that we must in collective fashion, continue to rally as a group to overcome these challenges. Please allow me to say, that no one institution should bear the burden and struggle of solving institutional challenges on its own especially when among you is a repository of experiences that can be draw upon to provide the lift that we more than often need.

With this, I ask those of you who have spent a great portion of your professional careers in quality systems to continue to provide your support and to continue to be the stalwarts for QI. To the new comers – and once upon a time I would consider myself in this group but my grey hair now tells me otherwise – I want to encourage you to be open and willing to bring fresh and innovative ideas to a dynamic field that could  never be short of it.

If you will allow me, I would now like to personally thank the Council for giving me this opportunity to serve as the Chairman. It was indeed an honour and privilege to serve in this capacity for the past two years. It was quite an experience, as I have candidly echoed to some of you, much of the credit is due to the work of the CEO and the staff of the Secretariat. Under his sound leadership and support CROSQ is gradually distinguishing itself from the pack, elevating itself as a premier CARICOM Organisation on this platform for RQI.

The CEO continues to thread the needle to ensure that the internal environment at the level of the Secretariat continues to evolve to meet the multidimensional and multidisciplinary needs of the external environment in our region. This has brought to bear a Branding Strategy that is tightly knit to meet the region’s needs in an efficient and effective manner. It should come as no surprise then that we are indeed turning heads. The CEO’s efforts to draw the attention of regional and international organisations to the unfolding of an RQI in the Caribbean has been nothing short of relentless.

This pivoted on the successes that the region has been experiencing despite the multiplicity of needs across an economic and geographical space that may at times, appear far and wide. The push for the RQI in the Caribbean to stand its own, is an opportunity to explore new frontiers across other regional organisations that not only can assist and support our region but that can also equally learn from us. The CEO has ensured that this plays out to the tune of a region that is outward looking; fully embracing of new alliances that will undoubtedly propel the growth and development of the RQI further into the foreseeable future.  To the CEO and his staff, I extend my deepest and sincerest gratitude for all the support that they have given me during this time. 

I think it is most appropriate to close with a bold declaration that the RQI is on an unprecedented path of development and as it continues to gather momentum, I remain ever so excited and positive about its future. It is my sincerest hope that we continue to support the Secretariat and the incoming Chair as they carry us into what I consider a promising future.

Colleagues, ladies and gentlemen, let not our hearts be troubled, the RQI is in a good place.  I welcome you and thank you once again.

(Mr. Trejo is also the Director of the Belize Bureau of Standards.)

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The following is an edited version of the speech delivered by Acting Executive Director of the St. Kitts & Nevis Bureau of Standards (SKNBS), Mr. Hiram Williams at the Opening of the 31st Meeting of the Council of CROSQ, held at the Marriott Resort, Frigate Bay, St. Kitts & Nevis on Thursday, October 5, 2017. 

"Being part of the global market, the Government of St. Kitts and Nevis is signatory to trade agreements such as the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Agreement, implemented within the World Trade Organisation (WTO), for which the Bureau of Standards is designated as the Enquiry Point. Under the TBT agreement, states parties are obligated to base their national technical regulations on international standards and to participate in conformity assessments systems.

The World Trade Organization Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (WTO/TBT) recognises the importance and the role of international standards and conformity assessment systems in improving efficiency in production and facilitating global trade. The process of developing National Standards requires significant technical and financial resources. Member States have to use the limited technical and financial resources well.

Developing and effectively implementing standards is not only a lengthy exercise but also costly. A lot of people from these organizations take personal loans to cover such costly expenses! It is important that we make good use of these limited resources to develop our Quality Infrastructure as it relates to Standardisation, Metrology, Certification, Accreditation and Conformity Assessment. Our membership in CROSQ provides us with access to standards developed and harmonised through the coordinated effort of the organisation's Technical Management Committee (TMC). Hence, the Government will continue to support  the  Bureau’s  participation in our own regional organisation CARICOM Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ), and also support our strategic alliance with International Organisations such as the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO), the Inter-American Metrology System (SIM), Codex Alimentarius (the world’s  most recognised food standards body), Pan-American Standards Commission (COPANT), International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and ASTM International.

The SKNBS is happy to participate in CROSQ's programme to harmonise regional standards and promote their awareness to improve competiveness and facilitate regional and international trade.  In this regard, we commend CROSQ for developing a regional standardisation strategy and also for assisting the Member States in developing their own National Standardisation Strategies.

We are pleased with our partnership with CROSQ and the other Member States as we work together as a region to influence the content of International Standards.  And indeed, this was demonstrated recently under the SKNBS's project – “Enhancing the National Quality Infrastructure of ST. Kitts and Nevis”, where we received valuable technical assistance from CROSQ in providing the Technical Officer for Standards from the Secretariat and the Chief Technical Officer for Standards at the Barbados National Standards Institute (BNSI), Mr St. Prix and Mr Scott respectively, to assist us in the implementation of the National Standardisation Strategy. Similarly, we are grateful to the Bureau of Standards Jamaica (BSJ) and Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards (TTBS) for facilitating training attachments for SKNBS technical staff.

Standards and Conformity Assessment procedures are critical and essential to our national quality infrastructure as it relates to health and safety, industry and commerce and to the nation's economic performance. It is estimated that about 80% of global trade in goods and services is affected by standards and technical regulations based on standards.  For this and other economic reasons, it is essential for countries to develop and implement national standardisation strategies that will facilitate the development and adoption of standards to meet market needs and requirements to effectively compete and trade globally.

Our membership in regional and international organisations permits us to influence the development and content of regional and international standards and conformity assessment programmes that enhance our position in the global marketplace.

So in addition to our involvement in CROSQ and being the enquiry point for the WTO - TBT agreement, the Bureau is also:

  • Contact point for Codex Alimentarius, the leading international food standard organisation,
  • one of the contact points for International Food Safety Authorities Network (INFOSAN),
  • focal point for the Stockholm Convention that deals with the reduction and eventual elimination of persistent organic pollutants, and also,
  • the focal point for the Minamata Convention.

And I am pleased to inform you that on the advice of the Bureau of Standards, the Government of St. Kitts and Nevis ratified the Minamata convention in May 2017.  The Minamata Convention on Mercury is a global treaty to protect human health and the environment from the adverse effects of mercury.

In keeping with the Bureau’s responsibilities and the Federation's obligations under international trade agreements, such as the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA), the Bureau has embarked on the development of training programmes and projects specifically geared towards building our Quality Infrastructure. And, as mentioned earlier, we requested and received technical assistance from CROSQ for development and implementation of a process to adopt and develop standards according to best practices. One of the main outcomes was the establishment of six (6) technical committees to address issues and matters that are relevant and important to the Federation. The committees established were:

  • National Committee on Environmental Management;
  • Committee on Labelling;
  • Committee on Tourism and Related Services;
  • National Committee on Codex, to deal with Food Safety and Standards;
  • National Committee on Information and Communication Technology, and
  • The Energy, Electrical and Mechanical Technical Committee

And these six committees are in addition to the existing National Committee of Conformity Assessment Bodies, which is chaired by Dr Marcus Natta, SKNBS’ Science and Research Manager, who is also the National Accreditation Focal Point and presently in Geneva attending  one of ISO's -  Committee on Conformity Assessment (CASCO) working group meetings.

Another programme that the SKNBS benefited from was also supported by CDB under the 10th EDF standby facility project “Enhancing the National Quality infrastructure of St. Kitts and Nevis”. This project provided assistance to the Bureau (SKNBS) to undertake development plans to ensure accuracy and reliability of its test results. Hence a major milestone in this plan is to be accredited to ISO/IEC 17025 standard and upgrade and acquiring key pieces of equipment. During the last 12 months, the SKNBS staff has worked extremely hard in developing and receiving training for the implementation of a Quality Management System as per the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025. And as I said, our aim is to be accredited by 2018 starting with selected microbiology tests.

I want to take this opportunity to commend the CEO and staff of CROSQ, particularly over the last year where there has been a drive with success to develop and establish new partnerships and cooperation with relevant regional and international organisations of interest to Member States. We have to adapt to a changing world and this type of partnership and cooperation will help CROSQ to demonstrate and establish itself as a significant and relevant regional standards organisation that can prepare Member States to have an impact on the content of international standards.

Therefore, on behalf of the Minister and the Ministry of International trade, Industry, Commerce and Consumer Affairs, we express our appreciation for having the opportunity to host the 31st Council of CROSQ meeting and Energy Awareness Seminar and wish that we have a fruitful and successful two days of deliberations.

Thank you."

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Facilitator Mrs. Silvana Demicheli leading the trainers through a number of exercises aimed at building their own abilities as trainers. Featured

Efforts are being made to equip the Caribbean’s measurement scientists (metrologists) with training skills to assist industry in addressing their calibration needs as well as their counterparts in National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) across the Region.

Eighteen such metrologists, practitioners in the science of measurement, from a number of National Standards Bureaux in the CARICOM Region, are in Barbados this week to participate in a Training of Trainers workshop at the Divi Southwinds Hotel, St. Lawrence Main Road, Christ Church.

At the weeklong workshop, which opened on Monday, July 24 and ends Friday, July 28, 2017, Finance Manager with the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ), Mr. Mohan Nandwani underscored how important the event was to aid in the facilitation of regional trade.

“When we talk about quality, we are not just talking about science, we are talking about developing the financial infrastructure of the Caribbean; trade – that is what it is really all about. Quality will drive the trade that the Caribbean does and it is only through these kinds of workshops and so on that we can build that quality which will eventually feed itself into public and private sector development, and trade is the key here. This is what we are aiming towards,” said Mr. Nandwani on behalf of CROSQ.

The Training of Trainers workshop was facilitated by CROSQ, but funded by the German Federal Government through the “Capacity Building in Technical and Scientific Organisations Using Regional Knowledge and Experience” Project, more commonly called CABUREK and the Regional Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Project, known as the R3E Project. Both projects are initiatives of the German National Metrology Institute (PTB).

About this collaboration, Mr. Nandwani said: “This CABUREK project has been organised into three working groups of which the Working Group 2 is tasked with developing a regional training programme in metrology for industry. In addition to developing the curriculum and content for this training course, the Working Group aims to create a group of trainers that are qualified to offer training in mass metrology, temperature metrology, volume metrology and the estimation of measurement uncertainty.”

Calibration is the comparison of a measurement device with an established standard. Businesses of all types need this service to ensure that their measurement devices such as scales, thermometers and other meters are giving accurate readings.  Their staff also need to know how to use these measurement devices correctly and how to do their own internal calibrations. This workshop aims to address these training needs of industry and other quality management professionals.

PTB Consultant, Mrs. Anett Matbadal explained a bit more about what CABUREK was and why it was important to the Caribbean and industry.

“The current CABUREK Programme runs from March 2016 to March 2018, so we are pretty much over half of this; and the idea is working with and learning from your peers. You are all representatives of NMIs and you all basically do the same jobs. CABUREK is implemented in Latin America and the Caribbean, so it is just logical to learn from one another.

“Some [of you] are a bit ahead in the development; some are still to find themselves, so it is good to sit together, work together in groups on specific topics, to learn from others, experience the good and bad lessons learnt. That is why this is a pretty interesting concept and you are here working within this programme,” said Mrs. Matbadal.

While Working Group 2 of CABUREK is tasked with Developing a Regional Training Offer, the PTB consultant said that overall the idea is to strengthen the capabilities of the human resource in metrology within the Caribbean.

“We start in the Caribbean . . . and that is the idea, [that this training can] be extended to other regions – Latin America or even beyond that. We started with developing a regional training offer, and you will understand that the basis for a good training offer is a good trainers’ pool, who is capable, well-trained, and our idea is that these trainers use standardised training material. So the idea is to develop certain training courses that the Caribbean needs, using standardised training material. It can be organised in every country, every region. It is targeting primarily, the industrial sector, private sector, public sector, but not the NMI itself,” said Mrs. Matbadal.

The training is being conducted by Mrs. Silvana Demicheli of the National Metrology Institute of Uruguay (LATU), with Mrs. Matbadal and CROSQ’s Technical Officer, Metrology, Mr. David Tomlinson, providing support, as part of the CABUREK group of trainers.

Metrology is the science of measurement and in the Caribbean region, most NMIs are located within the National Standards Bureaux.

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